“We should cover people regardless of immigration status”


A California county voted Tuesday to restore primary health care services to undocumented adults living in the county.

Contra Costa County, which includes the cities of Richmond, Concord and Antioch, joins 46 other California counties that have agreed to provide non-emergency care to immigrants who entered the country illegally.

“Providing health care coverage to all is not only about the human morality issue that we should address, but also from a cost-effective point of view … this is absolutely the right thing,” said Jane Garcia, CEO of La Clínica de la Raza, which serves 25,000 patients in Contra Costa, many of them low-income Latinos.

Adult immigrants who are undocumented are not able to participate state health exchanges under the Affordable Care Act, but can get emergency care in hospitals.
The program is not full scope insurance, but will provide preventive care. Health care providers and other supporters say that increasing access to preventive services will cut down visits to the emergency room and save the county money in the long run.

“It will mean better health care access for all, improved public health, lower cost to our health care system, and it’s just the right thing to do for people, especially undocumented adults who are not covered under the Affordable Care Act,” said County Supervisor John Gioia, a supporter of the measure.

The movement to increase health care access to more residents has also made strides at the state level. In June, the California legislature and Gov. Jerry Brown announced a budget deal to provide public healthcare coverage for undocumented children from low-income families as early as May 2016.

A number of California counties were already covering children regardless of immigration status, says Tanya Broder, staff attorney at the National Immigration Law Center. That paved the way for the statewide agreement.

“California is one of the few states with a large immigrant population that recognizes that it makes sense to provide health care to immigrants ineligible for federal care,” said Broder. “And the state is taking steps to provide coverage to all residents, but it’s not there yet.”

At least two recent proposals to expand health coverage to undocumented adults have been unsuccessful in the state legislature. However, Broder believes the issue will resurface next year.

Alvaro Fuentes, executive director of the Community Clinic Consortium, led efforts to revive health care services for undocumented adults in Contra Costa County.

“Now, the conversation is not whether we should cover people regardless of immigration status. It’s how do we do it,” said Broder.

Washington, Illinois, New York, Massachusetts and the District of Columbia already provide health coverage for immigrant children. But D.C. goes even further. At the state level, only D.C. allows all qualifying residents, including the undocumented, to receive public health coverage through the DC Healthcare Alliance program, according to data from the National Immigration Law Center.

In its first year, the program, Contra Costa Cares, will assign up to 3,000 people a “medical home” at a community health center. Benefits will include regular physician check-ups, immunizations, a nurse advice line and mental health services.

Rosa Arriaga, 72, joined the dozens of supporters wearing “Health4All” t-shirts who packed the supervisors’ meeting. She buys over-the-counter medication to help ease the arthritic pains she feels in her knees and along her left arm, but hopes to get regular medical treatment for her asthma and depression as well.

“I have worked, paid taxes and never asked for anything from the government. But now I feel sick, and I need to see a doctor,” said Arriaga in Spanish. She has lived in Richmond for 24 years.

“It’s not just me. A lot of other people in the county need this program,” added Arriaga, who is currently unemployed and says she has trouble paying the rent for a single room she shares with her nephew.

The Cares program is being established as a year-long pilot program. It will benefit 16 percent of the estimated undocumented population in Contra Costa, about 19,000 people. Advocates hope the program will continue and be expanded after this first year.

The Board of Supervisors agreed to allocate $500,000 to Cares. In addition, three local hospitals — including Kaiser, Sutter Health and John Muir Health — have promised an additional $500,000 in funding.

Supervisor Candace Andersen cast the lone dissenting vote, saying that she worries that funding for the program is not sustainable.

“To me when you start a pilot program, you need to see where to go next, and I don’t see the funding in place right now,” said Andersen. “I’m very troubled that we are having to take half a million dollars from our general fund.”

Before the summer, only a few counties in California provided health care services to immigrants in the country illegally. In June, a group of 35 mostly-rural counties in California opted to cover all residents regardless of immigration status, according to the advocacy group Health Access. Last week, the Monterey County Board of Supervisors gave a thumbs-up to expanding health care services.

“Contra Costa is in good company in regards to this,” said Anthony Wright, executive director of Health Access. “It’s a really important step forward.”

In California, an estimated 1 million undocumented immigrants remain uninsured, said Wright.

Pentagon labs may have mishandled plague bacteria – CDC

© Manuel Balce Ceneta

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating laboratories run by the US Department of Defense for possibly mishandling, and improperly storing and shipping potentially live plague samples.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) discovered a plague sample in a freezer outside the containment area of the Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center in Maryland last month, according to USA Today.

The sample was labeled inactive, yet the CDC “is conducting additional testing” for an ultimate determination on any potential infectiousness, Pentagon press secretary Peter Cook said, according to Stars and Stripes. The CDC is also investigating a strain of equine encephalitis discovered at Edgewood.

The public is not in danger from the plague or encephalitis specimens found at the lab, Army spokesman Dov Schwartz told USA Today. The conclusion was based on testing done on researchers who had worked with the specimens. Conclusive test results are expected by the end of September.

“These developments directly contributed to the Army’s decision to issue last week’s safety review and the extension of the existing moratorium on the handling of select agents and toxins,” the Army said.

The US Army announced last week that, out of caution, it was instituting a moratorium on all research activity at nine Pentagon labs that have worked with toxins, pathogens, and bacteria after an incident at a lab in Utah in which live anthrax was sent to 192 labs spread throughout all 50 states and nine other countries.

READ MORE:  Pentagon’s anthrax blunder reveals ‘major protocol problems’

The CDC’s investigations at the facilities led to the discovery of the plague bacteria. Cook could not confirm if the plague strain is related to Yersinia pestis, which led to the bubonic plague that killed millions in the 14th century, Stars and Stripes reported.

Facilities investigated by the CDC include the Dugway Proving Ground in Utah, and three labs in Maryland: the Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, the Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center, and the Naval Medical Research Center.

READ MORE:  Army shipped live anthrax for 10 years, couldn’t effectively kill bacteria – CDC

The other five labs subject to the Army’s moratorium and safety reviews include the 711th Personnel Wing at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio; US Naval Medical Research Unit 3 in Egypt; US Naval Medical Research Unit 6 in Peru; the US Army Soldier Systems Center in Massachusetts; and the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Virginia.

“CDC has identified a number of transfers of concern involving multiple organisms,” the CDC said in a statement. “At this time, there is nothing to suggest risk to the health of workers or the general public.”


Most of the transfers were between Pentagon labs, the CDC said. The Army maintained that all materials had been handled properly, and that no researchers were exposed.

From April 1 to August 28, there were 11 cases of the plague reported in the US, which have resulted in three deaths. The victims were residents of Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, New Mexico, Oregon, and Utah, with two cases connected to exposures at or around Yosemite National Park. The patients ranged from age 14 to 79, and nine of the 11 were male.

Taxpayers Fleeing Democrat-Run States for Republican Ones


Americans escaping high taxes and welfare states

by Americans For Tax Reform | September 4, 2015

In 2013, more than 200,000 people on net fled states with Democrat governors for ones run by Republicans, according to an analysis of newly released IRS data by Americans for Tax Reform.

“People move away from high tax states to low tax states. Every tax refugee is sending a powerful message to politicians,” said ATR President Grover Norquist. “They are voting with their feet. Leaders in Texas and Florida are listening. New York and California are not.”

That year, Democrat-run states lost a net 226,763 taxpayers, bringing with them nearly $15.7 billion in adjusted gross income (AGI). That same year, states with Republican governors gained nearly 220,000 new taxpayers, who brought more than $14.1 billion in AGI with them.

Only one-third of states with Democrat governors gained taxpayers, compared to three-fifths of states with Republican governors.

Top 5 loser states for Democrat governors in 2013:

·      New York (114,929 people with $5.7 billion in AGI)

·      Illinois (68,943 people with $3.8 billion in AGI)

·      California (47,458 people with 3.8 billion in AGI)

·      Connecticut (14,453 people with $1.8 billion in AGI)

·      Massachusetts (11,915 people with $1 billion in AGI)

Top 5 winner states for Republican governors in 2013:

·      Texas (152,912 people with $6 billion in AGI)

·      Florida (74,094 people with 8.3 billion in AGI)

·      South Carolina (29,176 people with 1.6 billion in AGI)

·      North Carolina (26,207 people with $1.5 billion in AGI)

·      Arizona (16,549 people with $1.5 billion in AGI)

The single largest net migration from one state to another took place between New York and Florida (17,355 people).




One out of about every twelve newborns in the United States is an anchor baby, or the U.S.-born child of illegal migrants, according to a Pew Research Center study.

This means that one anchor baby is delivered every 93 seconds, based on the 2008 censusdata analyzed by the Pew.

The huge number of foreign children born on U.S. soil– roughly 340,000 per year— is also an economic imposition on Americans, who pay taxes to help raise, feed, and educate those children of illegal migrants.

Eventually, those 340,000 U.S.-born foreign children can join the U.S. workforce and compete for wages against the roughly four million children of U.S. parents that enter the slow-growing U.S. economy each year.

Only 28 percent of likely U.S. voters believe that children born to illegal migrants in this country should automatically be American citizens, according to a 2011 Rasmussen Reports survey. In fact, the proposal is so unpopular that even Jeb Bush, who favors large-scale immigration, has criticized pregnant foreigners who grab citizenship for their kids by flying into the country posing as tourists. Bush described the practice as “fraud,” and asserted that, “Frankly, it’s more related to Asian people coming into our country — having children in that organized effort, taking advantage of a noble concept, which is birthright citizenship”

The growing industry of “birth tourism” is so large that even California’s government recently cracked down on the illegal — but rarely suppressed— trade.

The federal government currently grants automatic citizenship to all U.S.-born children of illegal migrants based upon what experts say is a flawed interpretation of the 14th amendment. This interpretation is backed by progressive political advocates and wealthy business interests, and it allows a pregnant foreigner to win citizenship — and myriad financial benefits — even when laws, legislators and voters oppose her entry into the nation.

The rewards to the mother and father are huge. The mother, for example, can collect federal welfare on behalf of the child, and the adult child – as a U.S. citizen – will eventually be able to win a green card for his or her parents, despite their prior illegal entry into the United States.

As National Review writes:

71 percent of illegal-alien headed households with children received some sort of welfare in 2009, compared with 39 percent of native-headed houses with children. Illegal immigrants generally access welfare programs through their U.S.-born children, to whom government assistance is guaranteed. Additionally, U.S.-born children of illegal aliens are entitled to American public schools, health care, and more, even though illegal-alien households rarely pay taxes.

The cost of K-12 public school alone for a U.S.-born child of illegal migrants is, at a minimum, around $160,000 (using the average cost $12,300 per pupil per year). Additionally, under universities’ system of racial preferences, anchor babies will get bonus SAT and GPA points when they apply to college. Many corporations will continue this benefits program when considering their job applications as well.

Both Senator

Sen. David Vitter (R-LA) 71%

and CongressmanRep. Steve King (R-IA) 77%

have introduced bills that would correct this misapplication of the 14th amendment by ensuring citizenship is only granted to a child that has at least one parent who is either a U.S. citizen or a legal permanent resident. Presidential candidate Donald Trump has also issued a plan that would restrict this appropriation of U.S. citizenship.But the presidential candidates favored by wealthy donors,

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) 80%

and Jeb Bush, have both argued that the United States should continue this controversial application of the 14th amendment that allows foreign migrants to appropriate U.S. citizenship for their children.Marco Rubio co-authored the Senate Gang of Eight bill, which won the endorsement of La Raza and would substantially increase family chain migration.

When asked by CNBC why he defends this unpopular application of the 14th amendment, Rubio explained that he supports it because U.S.-born foreign children “are people”:

“Those are human beings and ultimately they are people, we’re not just statistics, they’re humans with stories,” Rubio said.

Birth tourism: 71% of illegals with kids collect welfare…



Peter and Ellie Yang,” the subjects of Benjamin Carlson’s fascinating new Rolling Stone essay, “Welcome to Maternity Hotel California,” paid $35,000 to have their second child in the United States. In 2012 Chinese state media reported 10,000 “tourist births” by Chinese couples in the United States; other estimates skew as high as 60,000. Following Donald Trump’s call for an end to birthright citizenship, and renewed attention on “anchor babies,” Carlson’s exposé on “birth tourism” seems to confirm that the current interpretation of the 14th Amendment works as a magnet for at least some parents across the globe. But just how big a magnet is it? According to Center for Immigration Studies (CIS) legal policy analyst Jon Feere, who testified before the House Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Immigration and Border Security in April, between 350,000 and 400,000 children are born annually to an illegal-alien mother residing in the United States — as many as one in ten births nationwide. As of 2010, four out of five children of illegal aliens residing in the U.S. were born here — some 4 million kids. Reporting that finding, the Pew Research Center noted that, while illegal immigrants make up about 4 percent of the adult population, “because they have high birthrates, their children make up a much larger share of both the newborn population (8 percent) and the child population (7 percent) in this country.” The cost of this is not negligible. Inflation-adjusted figures from the U.S. Department of Agriculture projected that a child born in 2013 would cost his parents $304,480 from birth to his eighteenth birthday. Given that illegal-alien households are normally low-income households (three out of five illegal aliens and their U.S.-born children live at or near the poverty line), one would expect that a significant portion of that cost will fall on the government. And that’s exactly what‘s happening. According to CIS, 71 percent of illegal-alien headed households with children received some sort of welfare in 2009, compared with 39 percent of native-headed houses with children. Illegal immigrants generally access welfare programs through their U.S.-born children, to whom government assistance is guaranteed. Additionally, U.S.-born children of illegal aliens are entitled to American public schools, health care, and more, even though illegal-alien households rarely pay taxes. RELATED: Trump’s Critics Are Wrong about the 14th Amendment and Birthright Citizenship The short-term cost of “anchor babies” was revealed a decade ago in the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons. “‘Anchor babies’ born to illegal aliens instantly qualify as citizens for welfare benefits and have caused enormous rises in Medicaid costs and stipends under Supplemental Security Income and Disability Income,” wrote medical attorney Madeleine Pelner Cosman. She noted the increasingly costly situation in California: In 2003 in Stockton, California, 70 percent of the 2,300 babies born in San Joaquin General Hospital’s maternity ward were anchor babies, and 45 percent of Stockton children under age six are Latino (up from 30 percent in 1993). In 1994, 74,987 anchor babies in California hospital maternity units cost $215 million and constituted 36 percent of all Medi-Cal [California’s Medicaid program] births. Now [2005] they account for substantially more than half. While perhaps humane, measures such as the 1986 Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act, which requires hospital emergency departments to treat all patients with an “emergency” (an infinitely malleable term), regardless of documentation or ability to pay, have facilitated the abuse of American health care by illegal aliens, according to Cosman. RELATED: What Conservatives Get Wrong about Birthright Citizenship and the Constitution There are long-term costs, too. U.S.-born children of illegal aliens can sponsor the immigration of family members once they come of age. At 18, an “anchor baby” can sponsor an overseas spouse and unmarried children of his own; at 21, he can sponsor parents and siblings. There may be a long waiting period before that legal benefit is of use. But it’s a fact that illegal aliens with American-born children are much less likely to be deported, and that policy has been effectively enshrined in law with President Obama’s Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) policy, which would effectively grant amnesty to some 5 million illegal aliens, on top of the 2 to 3 million granted amnesty under his Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) policy. (DAPA is currently under scrutiny in the courts.) GET FREE EXCLUSIVE NR CONTENT It is difficult to contend that the promise of birthright citizenship is not serving as a magnet. Carlson’s Rolling Stone essay is not about “anchor babies,” as the term is commonly applied (to children of illegal aliens), but about “birth tourists” — persons from overseas, typically of some means, who acquire temporary visas in order to give birth in the United States. Yet if middle-class Chinese (and Russian and Turkish and Nigerian) couples are incentivized by the 14th Amendment to travel to the U.S. to give birth, shouldn’t it be an even bigger draw for expecting mothers from Latin America, who typically live in much more difficult circumstances? Note, as an indicator of the power of immigration incentives, the massive influx of unaccompanied minors that converged on the U.S.–Mexico border last summer when news of DACA spread through Central America. Ending birth tourism is difficult. The tools available to Customs and Border Patrol — for example, spotting and enforcing visa fraud — are ineffective, and the penalty for at least some visa-related offenses is a prohibition on visits after the current visit. MORE IMMIGRATION DID FACEBOOK INTENTIONALLY BLOCK POSTS FROM CONSERVATIVE IMMIGRATION THINK TANK? WORK IN BIGTECH FOR HIRE: AMERICANS NEED NOT APPLY ON IMMIGRATION, SANTORUM ADDS SUBSTANCE But “anchor babies” are a largely preventable phenomenon, mainly by simply enforcing current immigration laws. Stopping illegal immigration at the border, and instituting an actually effective visa-tracking system to crack down on overstays, would do much to discourage efforts to take advantage of American largesse. With The Donald’s prompting, birthright citizenship has become the focus of the current news cycle — despite the fact that, given current political realities, the composition of the Supreme Court, and the history of 14th Amendment jurisprudence, ending the practice is a fanciful aim. But that is all right. “Anchor babies” are a small, though not negligible, component of our ongoing illegal-immigration crisis. And prioritizing border and visa enforcement to help end our much larger problems will do much to resolve this one, too.

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