Report: Immigrant workers account for ALL employment growth since 2007

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BY SUSAN FERRECHIO | DECEMBER 19, 2014 | 1:00 AM

Migrant farm workers from Mexico carry a cooler of drinking water into the the field while…
Labor statistics show that foreign-born workers account for all net gains in U.S. employment in the past seven years, according to a group that advocates low immigration.

The Center for Immigration Studies issued a report Friday that found 1.5 million fewer U.S.-born workers employed in 2014 than prior to the recession in 2007. Foreign-born employment for both legal and illegal immigrants increased by more than 2 million workers during the same time period.

The data, which CIS obtained from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, is evidence that native-born workers could have a harder time finding jobs under President Obama’s plan to allow more than 5 million illegal immigrants to obtain work permits, CIS officials said.

“If we continue to allow in new immigration at the current pace or choose to increase the immigration level it will be even more difficult for the native-born to make back the ground they have lost in the labor market,” the report’s authors, Steven A. Camarota and Karen Zeigler, wrote.

Overall, the number of U.S.-born workers fell from 124,014 million in November 2007 to 122,558 million in November 2014. Foreign-born workers, who make up 17 percent of the workforce, increased from 23,104 million to 25,108 million in the same time period.

The BLS figures showed that 11 million fewer U.S.-born workers are in the labor force now compared to 2007, and that figure has not improved in the last year.

Camarota and Zeigler say the numbers show there is no labor shortage, “even as many members of Congress and the president continue to support efforts to increase the level of immigration.”

Related: The motivation behind GOP leaders’ push to pass CRomnibus in the lame duck

Immigration reform advocates, however, argue that while unemployment remains high in some places, foreign-born workers are more willing to take on jobs U.S.-born workers reject in the service sector, construction and farm fields, for example.

A May 22 report issued by the BLS found that the 2013 unemployment rate for foreign-born workers was 6.9 percent, compared to a 7.5 percent jobless rate for U.S.-born workers.

Hispanics made up nearly 48 percent of the foreign-born labor force in 2013, the BLS found.

Foreign-born workers, the agency said, were more likely to be employed in service occupations, rather than “management, professional and related occupations and in sales and office occupations.”

Congress in 2015 is likely to take on immigration reform in a piecemeal approach, rather than one comprehensive package, according to GOP lawmakers who will run both the House and Senate.

While border security will be a primary focus, lawmakers may also consider increasing visas for both low- and highly-skilled workers. They may also debate an expanded program for immigrant agricultural workers, known as a guest worker program, as well as a plan to legalize the 11 million people now living here illegally.

The issue has divided the GOP, with some conservatives arguing the move will depress wages and raise unemployment rates for U.S.-born workers and put an unmanageable strain on federal subsidies.

POLITICS: FINANCE Report: Immigrant workers account for all employment growth since 2007

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BY: Susan Ferrechio

Migrant farm workers from Mexico carry a cooler of drinking water into the the field while working at the Grant Family Farms on September 3, 2010 in Wellington, Colorado. (Photo by John Moore/Getty images)
IMMIGRATION LABOR PENNAVE ECONOMY BUDGETS AND DEFICITS LAW
Labor statistics show that foreign-born workers account for all net gains in U.S. employment in the past seven years, according to a group that advocates low immigration.

The Center for Immigration Studies issued a report Friday that found 1.5 million fewer U.S.-born workers employed in 2014 than prior to the recession in 2007. Foreign-born employment for both legal and illegal immigrants increased by more than 2 million workers during the same time period.

Story continues below

Related: Census: 30% of U.S. population growth will be immigrants, 78 million by 2060

The data, which CIS obtained from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, is evidence that native-born workers could have a harder time finding jobs under President Obama’s plan to allow more than 5 million illegal immigrants to obtain work permits, CIS officials said.

“If we continue to allow in new immigration at the current pace or choose to increase the immigration level it will be even more difficult for the native-born to make back the ground they have lost in the labor market,” the report’s authors, Steven A. Camarota and Karen Zeigler, wrote.

Related: Let’s learn from Canada’s ‘bootstrap’ immigration policy

U.S. employment numbers have been on the rebound for months.

The U.S. economy added 321,000 jobs in November, one of the strongest gains in three years.

The unemployment rate has steadily fallen and is now 5.8 percent, the lowest level since June 2008.

But Camarota and Zeigler say that employment numbers for U.S.-born workers has still not returned to pre-recession levels, while it returned to pre-recession levels for immigrant workers in 2012 “and has continued to climb.”
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Overall, the number of U.S.-born workers fell from 124,014 million in November 2007 to 122,558 million in November 2014. Foreign-born workers, who make up 17 percent of the workforce, increased from 23,104 million to 25,108 million in the same time period.

The BLS figures showed that 11 million fewer U.S.-born workers are in the labor force now compared to 2007, and that figure has not improved in the last year.

Camarota and Zeigler say the numbers show there is no labor shortage, “even as many members of Congress and the president continue to support efforts to increase the level of immigration.”

Related: The motivation behind GOP leaders’ push to pass CRomnibus in the lame duck

Immigration reform advocates, however, argue that while unemployment remains high in some places, foreign-born workers are more willing to take on jobs U.S.-born workers reject in the service sector, construction and farm fields, for example.

A May 22 report issued by the BLS found that the 2013 unemployment rate for foreign-born workers was 6.9 percent, compared to a 7.5 percent jobless rate for U.S.-born workers.

Hispanics made up nearly 48 percent of the foreign-born labor force in 2013, the BLS found.

Foreign-born workers, the agency said, were more likely to be employed in service occupations, rather than “management, professional and related occupations and in sales and office occupations.”

Related: Federal judge rules Obama’s immigration action unconstitutional

Congress in 2015 is likely to take on immigration reform in a piecemeal approach, rather than one comprehensive package, according to GOP lawmakers who will run both the House and Senate.

While border security will be a primary focus, lawmakers may also consider increasing visas for both low- and highly-skilled workers. They may also debate an expanded program for immigrant agricultural workers, known as a guest worker program, as well as a plan to legalize the 11 million people now living here illegally.

The issue has divided the GOP, with some conservatives arguing the move will depress wages and raise unemployment rates for U.S.-born workers and put an unmanageable strain on federal subsidies.

FEDS CRACK DOWN ON MCDONALD’S FOR OPPOSING MINIMUM WAGE STRIKES

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Labor agency demands “remedial relief as soon as possible”

by KURT NIMMO | INFOWARS.COM | DECEMBER 19, 2014

Obama’s federal National Labor Relations Board has issued complaints against McDonald’s franchises around the country that took action in opposition to minimum wage strikes.

“The complaints allege that McDonald’s USA, LLC and certain franchisees violated the rights of employees working at McDonald’s restaurants at various locations around the country by, among other things, making statements and taking actions against them for engaging in activities aimed at improving their wages and working conditions, including participating in nationwide fast food worker protests about their terms and conditions of employment during the past two years,” the NLRB office of public affairs states in a press release today.

According to the agency, activity by McDonald’s, including “discriminatory discipline, reductions in hours, discharges, and other coercive conduct directed at employees in response to union and protected concerted activity, including threats, surveillance, interrogations” and other actions are illegal.
The NLRB demands “remedial relief as soon as possible” and, short of that, it will litigate against the corporation and its franchises on March 30, 2015.

The complaint does not address accusations by McDonalds and other businesses that large unions are behind an effort to disrupt commerce and shut down restaurants and stores.

“The strikes are especially controversial because some have accused unions of paying workers $250-$500 to participate,” Eater reported on September 4.

“Some picket lines turned into temporary occupations, and several stores closed,” LaborNotes reported in August.

If successful, the strikes in 150 cities nationwide will have a dramatic impact of prices for consumers.

If union demands for raising the minimum to $15 an hour are met, prices will rise significantly, as noted by the Daily Signal:

A Big Mac meal increases from $5.69 to $7.82.
Wendy’s Son of a Baconator combo increases from $6.49 to $8.92.
Taco Bell’s 3 crunchy tacos combo increases from $4.59 to $6.31.
A Whopper meal increases from $6.15 to $8.46.
Subway’s turkey breast Footlong increases from $6.50 to $8.94.
“Most Americans eat fast food because they want a quick and inexpensive meal,” notes the Heritage Foundation. “If fast-food restaurants raised their prices, many of their customers would either eat at home or go to more expensive restaurants.”

Short of the minimum wage hike, fast food restaurants are realizing lower profits due in part to a lackluster economy.

In October, for instance, McDonald’s said third-quarter profit fell 30 percent as U.S. sales slumped for the fourth straight quarter.