Ebola Virus Symptoms and Prevention Tips

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Sep 30, 2014 By Brandon De Hoyos

With the confirmation of the first U.S. patient to test positive for the Ebola virus, concern about symptoms and how to prevent infection is likely to be at the forefront of people’s minds.
Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control, said in August that the risk of an outbreak in the U.S. is considered very low, as patients become contagious only when symptoms are shown and that American hospitals are well equipped to isolate cases to control the spread of the virus.

The early signs and symptoms of the Ebola virus include:
Fever
Severe headache
Joint and muscle aches
Chills
Weakness
Symptoms may become increasingly severe over time, the Mayo Clinic said, with additional symptoms present, including:
Nausea and vomiting
Diarrhea (may be bloody)
Red eyes
Raised rash
Chest pain and cough
Stomach pain
Severe weight loss
Bleeding, usually from the eyes, and bruising (people near death may bleed from other orifices, such as ears, nose and rectum)
Internal bleeding
There is no vaccine for the Ebola virus as of this time, but scientists and researchers are working on a variety of drugs that could one day combat the Ebola virus.
The best means of prevention are similar to those you would practice to prevent the common cold or the flu, and it starts at your bathroom sink. Thoroughly washing your hands, and practicing good hygiene with soap and water, is a good first step to preventing infection.
An alcohol-based hand rub containing at least 60 percent alcohol is an alternative when soap and water isn’t available.
Other Ebola virus prevention tips including:
Avoiding travel to areas with known outbreaks
Refraining from eating bush meat from developing nations, especially those where Ebola virus has been found
Avoid contact with infected people, including their body fluids and tissues.
Wear protective clothing, including gloves, masks, gowns and eye shields if you are a health care worker.
Dispose of needles and sterilize other instruments regularly to prevent infection.
Do not touch or handle the bodies of people who have died of the Ebola virus.
Remember, people with Ebola virus are most contagious in the later states of the disease, as symptoms become evident, the Mayo Clinic said.

British hostage in new ISIS propaganda video panning Obama strategy

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The Islamic State (IS) has released a third video showing John Cantlie, a British journalist held prisoner for two years, in which he delivers a scripted propaganda speech criticizing US President Barack Obama’s strategy against IS in Iraq and Syria.

Cantlie slams Obama’s tactics of using airstrikes and coalition plans to use Iraqi troops, Kurdish Peshmerga and Syrian rebels to fight the IS. The journalist delivered a response to Obama’s recent speech on the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, which he described as “prideful chest banging.”

“It was all disappointingly predictable; America is good, the Islamic State [formerly ISIS] is bad; and they will be defeated using aircraft and a motley collection of fighters on the ground,” he said, commenting on Obama’s speech.

Criticizing the US airstrikes in Iraq, Cantlie said, “Air power is good at taking out specific targets, but it is not good at taking and holding ground. For that you need effective and disciplined troops and it’s hard to see how this hodgepodge army with a long history of underperforming is going to be any form of credible infantry.”

The British hostage says organizing the Iraqi army will take months, and he dismissed the Free Syrian Army as an “undisciplined, corrupt and largely ineffective fighting force.” Cantlie adds that weapons, that the West provides to Syrian rebels, are sold by the rebels on the black market and then end up in the hands of IS fighters.

The five-minute, 34-second video was uploaded on Monday night. Cantlie, just like in the previous two videos, sits behind a desk in an orange jumpsuit, a reference to Guantanamo Bay detainees.

In an effort to rebuild the Iraqi army to be able to fight against IS, the Iraqi military command launched a campaign to re-enlist soldiers and officers who previously abandoned their units, so-called deserters. The New York Times reports that the de facto amnesty for deserters shows that the Iraqi army “desperately needs experienced soldiers.”

Abu Ismail, the owner of a plastics factory that was targeted on Sunday by what activists said were U.S.-led air strikes, gestures while standing at his destroyed factory in the Islamic State’s stronghold of Raqqa September 29, 2014. (Reuters/Stringer)Abu Ismail, the owner of a plastics factory that was targeted on Sunday by what activists said were U.S.-led air strikes, gestures while standing at his destroyed factory in the Islamic State’s stronghold of Raqqa September 29, 2014. (Reuters/Stringer)

The video appears to have been filmed before last Friday, as there is no mention of the British decision to join the US-led campaign. Cantlie makes no reference to British or US action in the regions, including US-led coalition airstrikes on Syrian oilfields and IS checkpoints, over recent days.

While the video was released on September 29, in the video Cantlie only talks about Obama’s 9/11 address and how the media reacted to his speech.

Cantlie quotes approvingly from a New York Times article critical of Obama’s strategy, written a day after Obama’s speech.

At the end of the video, Cantlie says “the Islamic State say they welcome meeting Obama’s under-construction army.”

Cantlie, who has worked for the Sunday Telegraph and Sunday Times, was kidnapped in Syria at the end of 2012. He had previously been captured in Syria in July 2012, but escaped after one week with the help from the Free Syrian Army.

Since August, the militant group released three gruesome videos showing the beheadings of US journalists James Foley and Steven Sotloff, and most recently of the British aid worker David Haines. The IS has threatened to execute another British hostage, Alan Henning, if airstrikes hitting IS targets don’t stop.

Meanwhile, the UK has completed five missions over northern Iraq. RAF Tornado jets have not dropped any bombs on IS targets yet, however, and are currently engaged in reconnaissance missions, gathering intelligence of the area and searching for suitable targets.

Just like in the first two videos, Cantlie concludes by saying, “Join me again for the next program.”

FEDS PLACE ILLEGALS IN EVERY STATE

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SCHOOLS SCRAMBLE TO HELP TEENS WHO CROSSED BORDER

BY KIMBERLY HEFLING

FRANKFORD, Del. (AP) — American schools are scrambling to provide services to the large number of children and teenagers who crossed the border alone in recent months.

Unaccompanied minors who made up the summer spike at the border have moved to communities of all sizes, in nearly every state, Federal data indicates, to live with a relative and await immigration decisions. The Supreme Court has ruled that schools have an obligation to educate all students regardless of their immigration status, so schools have become a safe haven for many of the tens of thousands of these young people mostly from central America living in limbo.

Delaware’s rural Sussex County has long attracted immigrants, partly because of work in chicken factories, and soybean and corn fields. The district’s population is more than one-quarter Hispanic, and for years has offered an early learning program for non-English speakers.

Still, officials were caught off guard by about 70 new students mostly from Guatemala – part of the wave crossing the border – enrolling last year, mostly at Sussex Central High School. The Indian River School District over the summer break quickly put together special classes for those needing extra English help.

On a recent school day, a group of these mostly Spanish-speaking teenage boys with styled spiky hair and high-top sneakers enthusiastically pecked away on hand-held tablets at the G.W. Carver Education Center, pausing to alert the teacher when stumped.

“If you don’t know what you’re supposed to write on the line, look at my examples, OK?” Lori Ott, their English language teacher, told one.

The students are eager but face barriers. Some can barely read or write in their native language.

The district’s goal is to get them assimilated – and eventually into a regular high school. There, they can earn a diploma, even if that means participating in adult education programs and going to school until they are 21.

“They just crave it, and they will come and ask questions,” Ott said. “How do you say this? And, how do you say that? They just participate and you can’t say enough about them.”

Donald Hattier, a school board member, said advance warning would have helped with planning. The federal government, he said, “just dropped this on us.” He wonders what’s next.

“The kids are still coming across the border. This problem has not been solved,” Hattier said.

Educators in Delaware and elsewhere say many of these students, who fled poverty and violence, have years-long gaps in schooling. For teenagers, learning in English can prove more difficult than for younger students. They also may be living with relatives or others they didn’t know, and the workings of an American school can be confusing.

Others experienced trauma, either in their home country or while crossing the border, and may need mental health help.

“It’s a new culture and they already feel that they are alone. … Some of them don’t have their parents here,” said English language instructor Alina Miron at Broadmoor High School in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The school has about a dozen of these students enrolled

In districts like hers, the influx means hiring new English language instructors.

Two foundations donated money to the Oakland Unified School District in California to help fund a person to connect about 150 unaccompanied students with legal and social services; many didn’t have legal representation at immigration hearings.

“We feel that we have moral obligation to serve these students as long as they are in the United States,” said Troy Flint, a district spokesman. “Until their fate is decided, we’re responsible for ensuring they get an education and we embrace that opportunity.”

In Louisiana, the Broadmoor principal, Shalonda Simoneaux, said attending high school and learning English is a motivating factor for teenagers who want “want to blend in.”

“Whatever is being said, whatever is going on, they are really learning more from listening from other teenagers, even more so than from the teachers because it’s high school,” Simoneaux said.

For cash-strapped districts, providing for these students’ needs can be arduous, particularly if they arrive after student headcounts are taken to determine school funding.

In Miami, the school board voted to seek federal help after 300 foreign-born students, many from Honduras and traveling alone, enrolled toward the end of the last school year.

Margie McHugh, director of the nonprofit Migration Policy Institute’s National Center on Immigrant Integration, says it’s critical that children allowed to stay are integrated into American life and educated.

Indian River School District officials say that’s their plan.

“We do have a very open heart and an open mind and any student who comes in our system, we’re going to give the most appropriate services that we can,” said the Delaware district’s superintendent, Susan Bunting.