WORLD PREMIERE OF HIT MUSIC VIDEO: “MY EBOLA ‘OBOLA’”

Itchy Ritchie and The Weird Dimensions have released their newest single, “My Ebola ‘Obola.’”

Thanks to Obama’s importation of Ebola into our country, it has now become his legacy.

Like George Dubya and his two wars, Obama has launched a war of disease on the American people. With the open borders and lax customs, every disease from the third world will be allowed to enter. Thanks Obola!

Press corps to White House: Let’s be real; you’re making this up as you go, right?

It is nice to occasionally hear reflected in the White House press pool what so many normal people have gleaned about this White House:

Two questions excerpted, from Roberta Rampton, who is with Reuters:

“Let’s take the case of the Pentagon. You talked about how the administration has been aware and has acted on an Ebola outbreak since March. And then shouldn’t these — shouldn’t a policy have been in place when you decided to send troops to West Africa? Shouldn’t — how you are going to treat those returning troops in a matter of a protocol then, rather than to what appears to be being made up on the fly?”…

“I’m confused tough because we have known about this outbreak for some time and we are going to hear as you say from CDC later on guidelines and protocols for returning medical workers which we know they were there. Why haven’t — and the Pentagon too in the case of these people who are being held or sort of semi-quarantined in Italy. Why weren’t these kinds of decisions made earlier?”
This represents more mainstreaming of the idea that these guys just don’t have what it takes to actually respond to crises. Most of us have found that obvious for quite some time, but it’s important when the press corps and “Saturday Night Live” start talking about it, as SNL did this weekend with a pretty sweeping indictment of a string of Obama administration failures,

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Date
10/27/2014
Summary
Reporter to W.H.: Why Is Pentagon Making Policy up ‘on the Fly’ for Military and Ebola?
Subjects
U.S. military, Josh Earnest, Pentagon, Ebola virus disease
Source
MSNBC
Show

Featured persons
Josh Earnest, Roberta Rampton
Event
Press Conference
Event location
White House, Washington, D.C.
Link
Not online media
Transcript
NN REPORTER: “Let’s take the case of the Pentagon. You talked about how the administration has been aware and has acted on an Ebola outbreak since March. And then shouldn’t these — shouldn’t a policy have been in place when you decided to send troops to West Africa? Shouldn’t — how you are going to treat those returning troops in a matter of a protocol then, rather than to what appears to be being made up on the fly [indecipherable]?”
EARNEST: “Well, Jim, the commitment of Department of Defense resources was something that the president announced I believe just last month. And this is an ongoing effort by the Department of Defense to use their logistical expertise in West Africa to assist those essentially first responders who are actually treating Ebola patients. We have been clear that the role American military personnel in West Africa will not be to render medical assistance to the people of West Africa. Instead, it will be the logistical expertise of the American military that will be deployed to assist those doctors and nurses and other public health experts from around the world who are responding to this urgent situation. That was a commitment made by the president just about a month or so ago. And that is — we are already seeing important work that’s being done in West Africa by our American military personnel. And as needed, they will continue to put in place policies that they believe are best protecting members of the military and the members of the public back here in the United States as well. OK. Roberta.”
RAMPTON: “Is the White House concerned that the decision made by one commanding officer in this case, the Pentagon? It is sending a mixed message to people about the need for these types of policies.”
EARNEST: “No. We believe that the — I mean, it is clear, and if it wasn’t clear before it is now that I’ve make it clear that the Department of Defense policy has not been settled and implemented yet. And they will ultimately — that will be a decision that is driven by a variety of operational factors. What we are — what this administration is working to do is to coordinate with state and local officials across the country to put in place the policies that scientific experts tell us are in the best interests of the American people. And that’s what we believe should guide the policy decisions that are made in this country.”
RAMPTON: “I’m confused tough because we have known about this outbreak for some time and we are going to hear as you say from CDC later on guidelines and protocols for returning medical workers which we know they were there. Why haven’t — and the Pentagon too in the case of these people who are being held or sort of semi-quarantined in Italy. Why weren’t these kinds of decisions made earlier?”
EARNEST: “Well, Roberta, I think what this reflects is a commitment by this administration to regularly review the guidelines that are in place to make sure that they reflect what is necessary to protect the American people. We should not lose sight of the fact that whatever guidelines and polices are put in place should not unduly burden those health care workers that in fact are operating in West Africa in very difficult situations. They are putting themselves at risk to try to meet the needs of other people. That is a pretty remarkable show of charity. It also is an effort that is clearly in the best interest of the American people because we know that the only way to entirely eliminate the risk from Ebola virus to the American people is to stop this outbreak in West Africa. And there are American citizens are using their own medical expertise in pursuit of that goal. These individuals are heroes and they are a commitment to their common man and to their country as one that should be respected. We believe that we can both show them the respect that they have earned while also ensuring that we have protocols in place that protect the American people.”

NIH Director Warns of Unintended Consequences from Mandatory Quarantines in New York, New Jersey

Melissa Quinn

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced mandatory quarantines for health workers returning from West Africa. However, such a policy could have negative, unintended consequences, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, warned today.

During an appearance on ABC’s “This Week,” Fauci said that “as a scientist and as a health person,” he wouldn’t have recommended the mandatory quarantines and said it’s unlikely the federal government would be changing its policies about dealing with Ebola patients.

The governors’ announcement came just one day after a physician with Doctors Without Borders was diagnosed with Ebola in New York City. He is being treated at Bellevue Hospital Center.

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn followed Christie and Cuomo’s lead and announced a mandatory quarantine in his state.

Obama Admin. Pressing NY and NJ Governors to Reverse Controversial Ebola Quarantine Orders

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Dave Urbanski

The Obama administration is pressing the governors of New York and New Jersey to drop their quarantine orders for medical personnel reentering the United States if they had contact with Ebola patients in West Africa, the New York Times reported, citing an administration official.

Obama Administration Pressing NY and NJ Governors to Reverse Controversial Ebola Quarantine Order
New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, left, speaks as New Jersey Governor Chris Christie listens at a news conference, Friday, Oct. 24, 2014 in New York. (Image source: AP/Mark Lennihan)
In fact, the Times said, top administration officials have been speaking daily with Andrew M. Cuomo of New York and have been in touch with Chris Christie of New Jersey regarding the matter. But on Sunday neither governor would budge from his stance, noting federal guidelines don’t go far enough, the Times reported.

A senior administration official told the Times the governors’ decision is “uncoordinated, very hurried” and “doesn’t comport with science.”

“The entire city was not informed, even the mayor’s office,” a New York City official involved in state’s Ebola response told the Times. “The mayor was caught unaware.”

“The big picture decision was made in the absence of any deep thinking about what implementing the policy would entail,” the official told the Times.

Meanwhile the quarantined nurse who criticized how she was treated after her plane landed in Newark, New Jersey, has retained a well-known civil rights lawyer, Norman Siegel, to challenge her quarantine order and get her out of isolation, the Times said.

“The policy infringes on Kaci Hickox’s constitutional liberty interests,” he noted in an interview on Sunday, the Times said. “The policy is overly broad as applied to Ms. Hickox and we are preparing to challenge it on her behalf.”

The Times noted the new federal policy regarding travelers returning from Ebola-hit areas are set to take effect Monday:

Under that new policy, any traveler retuning from Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea will be required to report their temperatures to their local health authorities. They will also be required to give health officials the names and addresses of their relatives and where they will be staying in the three weeks after they arrive, the approximate amount of time the disease takes to incubate.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute for Allergies and Infectious Disease, said it was vital not to do anything that might interfere with the flow of health workers to West Africa.

“The harm is that it is totally disruptive of their life. We want them to go because they are helping us to protect America to be over there,” Dr. Fauci said on CNN.

WHO: NUMBER OF EBOLA-LINKED CASES PASSES 10,000

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BY SARAH DILORENZO
ASSOCIATED PRESS

DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — More than 10,000 people have been infected with Ebola and nearly half of them have died, according to figures released Saturday by the World Health Organization, as the outbreak continues to spread.

The Ebola epidemic in West Africa is the largest ever outbreak of the disease with a rapidly rising death toll in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. There have also been cases in three other West African countries, Spain and the United States.

The U.N. health agency said Saturday that the number of confirmed, probable and suspected cases has risen to 10,141. Of those cases, 4,922 people have died. Its figures show about 200 new cases since the last report, four days ago.

Even those grisly tolls are likely an underestimate, WHO has warned, as many people in the hardest hit countries have been unable or too frightened to seek medical care. A shortage of labs capable of handling potentially infected blood samples has also made it difficult to track the outbreak. For example, the latest numbers show no change in Liberia’s case toll, suggesting the numbers may be lagging behind reality.

On Thursday, authorities confirmed that the disease had spread to Mali, the sixth West African country affected, and on the same day a new case was confirmed in New York, in a doctor recently returned from Guinea.

Mali had long been considered highly vulnerable to the disease, since it shares a border with Guinea. The disease arrived there in a 2-year-old, who traveled from Guinea with her grandmother by bus and died Friday.

The toddler, who was bleeding from her nose during the journey, may have had high-risk contact with many people, the World Health Organization warned. So far, 43 people are being monitored in isolation for signs of the disease, and WHO said Saturday that authorities are continuing to look for more people at risk.

To help fight Ebola, the U.N. humanitarian flight service airlifted about 1 ton of medical supplies to Mali late Friday. The seats of the plane were removed to make room for the cargo, which included hazard suits for health workers, surgical gloves, face shields and buckets, according to the World Food Program, which runs the flights.

The spread of Ebola to Mali has highlighted how easily the virus can jump borders, and Malian border police said that neighboring Mauritania closed its border with Mali.

The health minister of Ivory Coast, which borders Guinea and Mali, said authorities there were looking for a nurse who may have Ebola and fled from Guinea, where he was being monitored by officials. But Raymonde Goudou stressed that it was still not clear whether the man had Ebola.

There was concern also in Ghana, where some worried a strike by health care workers could leave the country vulnerable to the disease. Ghana does not border any country with reported cases, but it is serving as the headquarters for the U.N. mission on Ebola.

In Liberia, the country hardest hit by the epidemic, U.S. forces have been building desperately needed treatment centers and helping to bring in aid. On Saturday, Maj. Gen. Darryl Williams, who was in charge of the troops assigned to the Ebola response, handed power to Maj. Gen. Gary J. Volesky, the 101st Airborne commander.

“I’ve been told that by a number of people that the task we face is extremely hard. Well, a fairly famous person once said hard is not impossible,” Volesky said. “Together, we’re going to beat it.”

OBAMA CHOREOGRAPHED HUG WITH EBOLA VICTIM

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According to still photographers on the scene, his hug with Ms. Pham was staged

President Obama is usually “not interested in photo ops,” but apparently he made an exception for Friday’s good news that Nina Pham, the first Dallas nurse who contracted Ebola, is now virus-free.

These shocking photos may suggest some unsettling things about the customs of folks in Russia.

But according to still photographers on the scene, his hug with Ms. Pham was staged.

Mark Knoller, the White House correspondent for CBS News, took to Twitter with the allegation.

“Still photographers said they heard Pres Obama tell Nurse Nina Pham words to the effect of: let’s give a hug for the cameras,” Mr. Knoller tweeted.

It’s still a nice picture, but it might have been nicer if it was a bit less calculated and a bit more genuine.

Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/oct/24/optics-always-for-obama-photographers-say-hug-with/#ixzz3HBQZNHkc
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