Jade Helm: Long Train of Military Equipment Headed Into “Hostile” Salt Lake City, Utah

Published on Jun 26, 2015

http://www.undergroundworldnews.com

One of my subscribers sent in this footage and pictures. He stated he was traveling toward the city when he noticed the train hauling all the military equipment. These guys are locals, that have never seen this kind of movement in this area. They make mention also that Utah is a “Hostile” State on the Jade Helm Map. This convoy is loaded with just about everything we have seen thus far. All of this happening just weeks ahead of Jade Helm 15 Kicking Off.

I will keep you guys posted as i come across more. Stay Tuned!

http://www.undergroundworldnews.com

Obama: More G7 sanctions against Russia if Ukraine conflict continues

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The G7 states are ready to implement additional Russia sanctions over Ukraine, US President Barack Obama said at the G7 summit in Bavaria on Monday.

“There is strong consensus that we need to keep pushing Russia to abide by the Mink agreement,” Obama said. He added that the Western partners also need to encourage Kiev to stick to the Minsk deal.

“There was discussion of additional steps,” if Russia “doubles the aggression on Ukraine”, however they were on a technical and not political level, he added.

READ MORE: Leaders at G7 in Bavaria in call to uphold Russia sanctions

“Our hope is that we don’t have to take additional steps,” he said.

Obama said that the sanctions are hurting the Russian economy. He added that President Vladimir Putin would have to make a decision.

“Does he continue to wreck his country’s economy and continue Russia’s isolation in pursuit of a wrong-headed desire to recreate glories of the Soviet empire, or does he recognize that Russia’s greatness does not depend on violating the territorial integrity and sovereignty of other countries?” Obama said.

The G7 summit gathered world leaders for two days in southern Germany, with the crisis in Ukraine and the Greek economy topping the agenda.

On Monday, the G7 issued a joint communiqué summing up the results of their meeting. In regard to the Ukrainian crisis, the leaders agreed “that the duration of sanctions should be clearly linked to Russia’s complete implementation of the Minsk agreements and respect for Ukraine’s sovereignty.”

READ MORE: Russia has better things to do than start WW3 (OP-ED)

Investigative journalist Tony Gosling told RT that it seems Western politicians are being driven by the US into rhetoric about uniting against Russia.

“This is our old Cold War talk, that is really driven by the Americans, and it certainly does not represent the views of European people or business, which is a bit worrying,” he said.

Speaking to reporters Monday, French President Francois Hollande said that “there are currently no reasons” to lift sanctions against Russia. He added that the sanctions are “likely” to be extended until the end of 2015, and that the issue will be reviewed by the European Council in June.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel said that negotiations with Russia are taking place, adding that “international crises can be solved with the Russian Federation.”

At the opening of the G7 on Sunday, European Council President Donald Tusk said that “all of us would prefer to have Russia around the G7 table.”

However, Tusk also backed tougher sanctions against Russia, saying that he hoped they would be put in place at a meeting of EU leaders in Brussels in the end of June.

There has been a recent escalation of violence as residential areas were shelled in eastern Ukraine’s rebel-held territories. The Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) monitors have reported violations of the Minsk ceasefire agreements by both sides in the conflict.

Moscow has urged the implementation of the ceasefire, connecting the recent escalation with the upcoming EU summit in Brussels.

“Yes, indeed, in the past Kiev had already heated up tensions amid some large international events. This is the case, and now we are seriously concerned about the next repetition of such activity,” Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Thursday.

At the UN Security Council meeting on Saturday, Russia’s UN envoy, Vitaly Churkin, said that Ukraine’s “flagrant violation and blunt ignorance of the Minsk agreements” caused frustration even among the Western states “loyal to Kiev.”

‘2,300 Humvees in Mosul alone’: Iraq reveals number of US arms falling into ISIS hands

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Iraq has admitted that ISIS jihadists captured huge caches of US-made weapons, including thousands of Humvees seized from Iraqi forces retreating from Mosul last year. The spoils of war have since then been used by ISIS to gain ground in Iraq and Syria.

“In the collapse of Mosul, we lost a lot of weapons,” Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi said in an interview with Iraqiya state TV. “We lost 2,300 Humvees in Mosul alone.”

Capture

The number of potential heavy and light weapons abandoned by Iraq’s army remains unknown but over the past decade the US sold thousands of the armed vehicles to the Iraqis, in addition to tanks and other military hardware.

Iraq has admitted that ISIS jihadists captured huge caches of US-made weapons, including thousands of Humvees seized from Iraqi forces retreating from Mosul last year. The spoils of war have since then been used by ISIS to gain ground in Iraq and Syria.

“In the collapse of Mosul, we lost a lot of weapons,” Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi said in an interview with Iraqiya state TV. “We lost 2,300 Humvees in Mosul alone.”

Islamic State (IS, formerly ISIS/ISIL) captured Iraq’s second city of Mosul in June 2014, as government forces retreated from the country’s Sunni stronghold.

READ MORE: ‘US air campaign against ISIS creating more jihadists’

The number of potential heavy and light weapons abandoned by Iraq’s army remains unknown but over the past decade the US sold thousands of the armed vehicles to the Iraqis, in addition to tanks and other military hardware.

Just this month the Pentagon estimated that at least half a dozen tanks were abandoned when Baghdad forces lost Ramadi, in addition to artillery pieces, and some 100 Humvees.

Read more
ISIS declares war on Shias on Arabian Peninsula – monitoring group

Meanwhile the US approved new arms deliveries to the Iraqis last December to replenish the stock ransacked by IS. One contract allows the sale of 175 heavy M1A1 Abarams worth $12.4 billion, while another approves the delivery of 1,000 Humvees, equipped with M2.50 caliber machine guns and MK-19 40mm grenade launchers.

They are exactly the types of weapons IS used to gain vast amount of territory both in Iraq and northern Syria. In fact, the first use of US-Humvees on Syrian territory was reported last year shortly after Mosul has fallen to jihadists.

In mid-May IS gained control of the capital of Anbar province where Iraqi forces had held out against militants for more than a year. They also secured control of Palmyra in Syria, carrying out many executions.

US intelligence points to growing IS strength

Meanwhile on Sunday CIA Director John Brennan acknowledged that IS gains in both Iraq and Syria did not really come as a surprise to the intelligence community.

Capture

Iraq has admitted that ISIS jihadists captured huge caches of US-made weapons, including thousands of Humvees seized from Iraqi forces retreating from Mosul last year. The spoils of war have since then been used by ISIS to gain ground in Iraq and Syria.

“In the collapse of Mosul, we lost a lot of weapons,” Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi said in an interview with Iraqiya state TV. “We lost 2,300 Humvees in Mosul alone.”

Islamic State (IS, formerly ISIS/ISIL) captured Iraq’s second city of Mosul in June 2014, as government forces retreated from the country’s Sunni stronghold.

READ MORE: ‘US air campaign against ISIS creating more jihadists’

The number of potential heavy and light weapons abandoned by Iraq’s army remains unknown but over the past decade the US sold thousands of the armed vehicles to the Iraqis, in addition to tanks and other military hardware.

Just this month the Pentagon estimated that at least half a dozen tanks were abandoned when Baghdad forces lost Ramadi, in addition to artillery pieces, and some 100 Humvees.

Read more
ISIS declares war on Shias on Arabian Peninsula – monitoring group

Meanwhile the US approved new arms deliveries to the Iraqis last December to replenish the stock ransacked by IS. One contract allows the sale of 175 heavy M1A1 Abarams worth $12.4 billion, while another approves the delivery of 1,000 Humvees, equipped with M2.50 caliber machine guns and MK-19 40mm grenade launchers.

They are exactly the types of weapons IS used to gain vast amount of territory both in Iraq and northern Syria. In fact, the first use of US-Humvees on Syrian territory was reported last year shortly after Mosul has fallen to jihadists.

In mid-May IS gained control of the capital of Anbar province where Iraqi forces had held out against militants for more than a year. They also secured control of Palmyra in Syria, carrying out many executions.

US intelligence points to growing IS strength

Meanwhile on Sunday CIA Director John Brennan acknowledged that IS gains in both Iraq and Syria did not really come as a surprise to the intelligence community.

“I went back over the intelligence of last week, taking a look at what we knew and when we knew it about ISIS and its movements inside of Iraq and Syria,” Brennan said in an interview on CBS’ Face the Nation. “We saw a growing strength.”

READ MORE: ‘Ditch double standards!’ Russia seeks united anti-ISIS front after Palmyra massacre

He attributed ISIS success to “a lot of factors” on the ground that came into play, in particular the lack of leadership in some Iraqi units and logistic support needed to fight extremists.

While the Iraqi troop’s failures could have looked as a “lack of a will to fight,” Brennan says in fact “there has been a fair amount of intelligence about the growing capabilities of ISIS as well as the challenges that beset the Iraqi government.”

Down the rabbit hole: Bin Laden raid was staged after extensive Pakistan-US negotiations – report

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Washington fabricated several key claims regarding the 2011 mission in which a US Navy SEAL team killed Al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, according to legendary journalist Seymour Hersh in the latest challenge to the White House’s narrative of the raid.

Hersh, writing in the London Review of Books, has alleged that the United States government and Pakistani officials in fact worked closely–attempting to smooth political and financial concerns between the two nations–prior to the May 2011 assault on bin Laden’s Abbottabad, Pakistan compound.

The White House still maintains that the mission was an all-American affair, and that the senior generals of Pakistan’s army and Inter-Services Intelligence agency (ISI) were not told of the raid in advance. This is false, as are many other elements of the Obama administration’s account, Hersh wrote.

The White House’s story might have been written by Lewis Carroll: would bin Laden, target of a massive international manhunt, really decide that a resort town forty miles from Islamabad would be the safest place to live and command al-Qaida’s operations?”

Contrary to US claims, bin Laden was not located through tracking of his couriers but through a “walk-in,” Hersh wrote in the piece, which was sourced mainly by a “retired senior intelligence official,” among a handful of anonymous others.

Read more

Bin Laden documents to be used in Briton’s terror trial

In August 2010, a “former senior Pakistani intelligence officer who was knowledgeable about the initial intelligence about bin Laden’s presence in Abbottabad” approached the CIA’s station chief at the US embassy in Islamabad to report bin Laden’s whereabouts. Once deemed reliable, the unnamed source — later moved to Washington to work as a CIA consultant — collected the outstanding $25 million reward offered by the US for information about bin Laden.

Bin Laden, Hersh wrote, was captured by Pakistan in 2006 and kept warehoused at the expense of Saudi Arabia, which wanted to keep the Al-Qaeda leader under wraps based on Riyadh’s close ties to the jihadist group. In addition, bin Laden was also considered a bargaining chip for Pakistan against Al-Qaeda and Taliban.

“The ISI was using bin Laden as leverage against Taliban and al-Qaida activities inside Afghanistan and Pakistan,” the retired official told Hersh. “They let the Taliban and al-Qaida leadership know that if they ran operations that clashed with the interests of the ISI, they would turn bin Laden over to us. So if it became known that the Pakistanis had worked with us to get bin Laden at Abbottabad, there would be hell to pay.

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Once confronted by the US about bin Laden’s location following the “walk-in” source’s information, Pakistan sought increased military aid and a “freer hand in Afghanistan” from the US in exchange for bin Laden.

Pakistani Army Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani and Gen. Ahmed Shuja Pasha, director general of Pakistan’s ISI, negotiated and facilitated terms surrounding the raid, including the assurance that “Pakistan’s army and air defence command would not track or engage with the US helicopters used on the mission.” The Pakistani officials operated under the assumption that President Barack Obama would not trumpet the killing in public for at least a week — which was not the eventual result.

“Then a carefully constructed cover story would be issued: Obama would announce that DNA analysis confirmed that bin Laden had been killed in a drone raid in the Hindu Kush, on Afghanistan’s side of the border,” Hersh wrote.

Upon reaching the facility in Abbottabad, Navy SEAL Team Six encountered no resistance, as an “ISI liaison officer flying with the Seals guided them into the darkened house and up a staircase to bin Laden’s quarters,” Hersh wrote.

The “invalid” bin Laden “was cowering and retreated into the bedroom. Two shooters followed him and opened up. Very simple, very straightforward, very professional hit,” the retired official said. Bin Laden was not, as the White House said, killed by the SEALs out of self-defense amid a firefight.

The SEALs had so much clearance, Hersh wrote, that after the raid – which included the crashing of a Black Hawk helicopter – they were able to wait several minutes unimpeded for additional air transportation outside the compound in a resort town very near Pakistani military installations and rife with armed personal bodyguards at private residences.

During the raid, bin Laden’s body was torn to pieces by rifle fire, according to the account, and parts of his body were later “tossed out over the Hindu Kush mountains.” His burial at sea consistent with Islamic custom — a claim made by US officials — was also fabricated, Hersh wrote.

The supposed cache of intelligence material taken from the compound was another lie, Hersh reported, used to justify the raid.

Read more

CIA barred from using vaccinations as cover after dozens of doctors killed

Among the covers the US offered to protect Pakistan’s part in the raid, it was alleged that Shakil Afridi, a “Pakistani doctor and sometime CIA asset,” ran an independent vaccination program in Abbottabad as a front in the US search for bin Laden. Though he had helped with CIA counterterror efforts in the past, Afridi “made no attempt to obtain DNA from the residents of the bin Laden compound,” Hersh wrote.

“News of the CIA-sponsored programme created widespread anger in Pakistan, and led to the cancellation of other international vaccination programmes that were now seen as cover for American spying,” he added.

Hersh is not the first to challenge official narratives of the bin Laden raid. As RT previously reported, former SEAL Team Six member Rob O’Neill — who was referred to only as “the shooter” in an Esquire magazine interview detailing the 2011 mission — went public in November as the person responsible for shooting bin Laden three times in the forehead.

O’Neill’s claims were disputed by another SEAL who came forward in 2012 with his own account of the raid. In ‘No Easy Day’, Mark Bissonnette, writing under the pseudonym ‘Mark Owen’, said the first person to enter bin Laden’s room, the “point man,” was, in fact, the SEAL that killed bin Laden.

Read more

US Navy investigates SEAL who allegedly killed Bin Laden

As Hersh noted, a bevy of Freedom of Information Act requests by news outlets seeking to unearth new revelations about the raid have been denied, barring public access to photographs, videos, or DNA test results confirming bin Laden’s death.

In 2010, a federal judge ruled that the US Department of Defense did not have to release such evidence to the public. An appeals court affirmed the decision in 2013.

It was later revealed that “Admiral [William] McRaven [head of Joint Special Operations Command at the time] had ordered the files on the raid to be deleted from all military computers and moved to the CIA, where they would be shielded from FOIA requests by the agency’s ‘operational exemption,’” Hersh wrote.

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Hersh’s long, distinguished career in journalism has included major revelations of US wrongdoing, including stories that exposed, in 1968, the My Lai massacre in Vietnam and, in 2004, the detainee abuses at the US Army-run Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. Yet his latest account is fielding pushback for “internal contradictions in the narrative he constructs,” as Vox.com’s Max Fisher wrote.

“Why, for example, would the Pakistanis insist on a fake raid that would humiliate their country and the very military and intelligence leaders who supposedly instigated it?

“A simpler question: why would Pakistan bother with the ostentatious fake raid at all, when anyone can imagine a dozen simpler, lower-risk, lower-cost ways to do this?” Fisher wrote.

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CIA apparatchiks predictably countered Hersh’s story, as well.

“Every sentence I was reading was wrong,” Michael Morell, recently the deputy director of the CIA, said Monday on ‘CBS This Morning.’

“The source that Hersh talked to has no idea what he’s talking about,” Morell said. “The person obviously was not close to what happened. The Pakistanis did not know.”

Hersh told CNN he was “not out on a limb” with the story.

“The story says clearly that I was able to vet and verify information with others in the community. It’s very tough for guys still inside to get quoted extensively.”

He stood by his own reporting.

“I’ve been around a long time,” Hersh said. “I understand the consequences of saying what I’m saying.”

Hersh said he’s waiting for the White House to deny his account.

“There are too many inaccuracies and baseless assertions in this piece to fact check each one,” White House National Security spokesman Ned Price said in a statement to reporters.