Zuckerberg Sought to Coordinate on ‘Political Operations’…


By Andrew Stiles

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg sought advice from Hillary Clinton’s campaign advisers about getting involved in politics and advancing policy goals such as immigration reform, according to emails published by WikiLeaks on Tuesday.

Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg emailed Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta in August 2015 to see if Podesta would be interested in meeting with Zuckerberg, who she described as “hungry to learn” about politics.

“He wants to meet folks who can inform his understanding about effective political operations to advance public policy goals on social oriented objectives,” Sandberg wrote.

Zuckerberg, whose pet issues include immigration reform, education, and scientific research, has already begun using his fortune to influence the political environment by funding advocacy groups. Apparently, he was looking for ways to take his advocacy to the next level.


‘Step Aside. Step Down.’ Mike Lee Asks Donald Trump To Quit Republican Race


Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT) wants Donald Trump to step down from the Republican presidential ticket, calling him a “distraction” from the conservative principles of the Republican party.

“Mr. Trump, I respectfully ask you, with all due respect to step aside. Step down. Allow someone else to carry the banner of these principles,” Lee said.

Lee published a video on Facebook of his reaction to Trump after the Republican nominee apologized Friday evening for using degrading rhetoric about women in a conversation ten years ago with Access Hollywood’s Billy Bush. The Washington Post published leaked audio of the conversation on Friday.


“I wouldn’t hire that person, wouldn’t want to be associated with that person and I certainly don’t think I’d feel conformable hiring that person to be the leader of the free world,” Lee said, pointing out that Republicans had been repeatedly asked to “settle” with Donald Trump.

Lee, a frequent Trump critic, never endorsed him as the Republican nominee, but hadn’t entirely denounced the Republican candidate. But in his video last night, Lee’s frustration was clear.

“This can’t continue, it’s time for us not to settle, it’s time to expect more,” Lee said.

He appeared angry by Trump’s definition of the leaked comments as a distraction.

“With all due respect sir, you sir are the distraction, your conduct, sir, is the distraction, it’s the distraction from the very principles that will help us win in November,” he said.

Lee called for a Republican candidate that reflected Republican principles, demanding a better candidate to lead them to defeat Hillary Clinton.

“There will be time to figure out the who,” said Lee. “Right now we’ve got to be focused on the what. And that what has to involve our greatest, our most noble principles.”



There won’t be any protests over this

SEPTEMBER 30, 2016

Police officers shot and killed a 6-year-old autistic boy during an incident in Louisiana, but the boy was white, wasn’t holding a gun and didn’t have a long criminal record, so don’t expect any protests or national media attention.

Video footage of last November’s fatal shooting of Jeremy Mardis by two deputy city marshals (pictured below) was shown in court on Wednesday.

Police claim they chased the boy’s father Christopher Few after he had an argument with his girlfriend and that Few used his vehicle as a weapon, prompting them to open fire.

“However, state District Court Judge William Bennett said the video doesn’t show Few using his car as a “deadly weapon” at the time of the shooting,” reports CBS News.

The clip posted above appears to back this up. The officer seems to be shooting at a stationary car while Few is clearly seen with his hands up.

Mardis, who had autism, died at the scene after suffering multiple gunshot wounds while his father survived. Police claimed they were chasing Few because of an outstanding warrant, although it was later confirmed that there were no outstanding warrants against him.

While ‘Black Lives Matter’ demonstrators will stage riots, attack reporters and burn down cities over the shooting deaths of black victims who invariably turn out to have either been carrying a gun or resisting arrest, saying “all lives matter” is racist, so there will be no protests over Mardis.

His death will not be spun into a grand narrative and used by the media to whip up hysteria because the boy’s skin isn’t the right color.

Mardis’ mistake was to not have accrued a long violent criminal record and posted pictures of himself on Facebook acting like a gang member. If the 6-year-old boy had done so, he may have got more sympathy from the media and BLM,

But just like the five white people killed by cops on the same day that Keith Scott was shot dead, police brutality is ignored unless it can be exploited for race-baiting, divisive, political purposes.

Censorship: Facebook Deleted 100,000 ‘Hate Posts, Insults’ in Just One Month


Facebook revealed that within the last month it deleted 100,000 posts by German users for containing “hate”, but Justice Minister Heiko Maas has blasted the figure as too low.

At a conference in Berlin, Maas said that to be accountable, social networks must publish the number of posts contested by users. The Justice Minister’s remarks implied that complainants on social media are valid judges of what constitutes criminal speech, something usually only determined by a court.

The number of deleted posts “with hate comments” was revealed this week by Facebook’s European policy director, Richard Allan. Maas criticised Facebook’s decision not to specify the number of comments users contested in the period and said that its response to complaints should be consistent across the board.

“We should consider whether to make social networks commit to disclose how many complaints for illegal hate comments they got and how they handled them,” the Social Democratic Party (SPD) politician argued.

Maas said that “too little” punishable content on the internet is being deleted and that posts are deleted too slowly.

Asserting that the biggest problem is that complaints from users are not taken seriously, he said: “Of the criminal content reported by users, Twitter deleted just one per cent, YouTube only ten, and Facebook 46 per cent. This is too little.”

In Germany’s fight against “hate speech” on the internet, a task force of several Internet companies including Facebook agreed to delete posts which are punishable under German law within 24 hours.

Jugenschutz.net, an organisation whose stated aim is to make the internet safer for children, assessed Facebook and Youtube’s performance in deleting the criminal content they reported.

YouTube removed 96 per cent of posts flagged by the organisation and 84 per cent of Facebook posts. “With both websites, half were deleted within 24 hours. This is much faster than in the spring,” Maas said.

Describing the situation as “improved, but far from good”, Maas said that the websites must be more consistent in their approach and so every complaint should be treated as equal to those put forward by jugenschutz.net.

The Justice Minister’s speech did not take into account the fact that the nonprofit may be less likely to make vexatious complaints than millions of social media users.

Since Angela Merkel’s decision to allow more than 1.6 million migrants into Germany, the government has taken an incredibly hard line on free speech on the internet. Police have conducted raids on the homes of people suspected to have made posts critical of migrants.

With the government piling ever more pressure on social media companies to monitor and police comments at regular intervals, many Germans unhappy with Merkel’s policies and the subsequent wave of crime perpetrated by the newcomers have fled to Facebook’s Russian competitor, VK.

Whatever you do, do not use Google Allo: Snowden

Google Allo, the new “smart” chat app launched on Wednesday, is ‘dangerous’ and should be avoided, according to whistleblower Edward Snowden.

The ex-NSA contractor posted a series of Tweets to warn everyone away from the chat app, which he says will “record every message you ever send and make it available to police upon request”.


Allo, designed to unseat chat pack leader WhatsApp, promises to deliver quick conversations with features like; “Smart Reply” that can guess your answers and respond to messages with just the tap of a button, and “Google Assistant”, which answers your questions and helps you search for things directly in your chat.

READ MORE: Tech firms distancing themselves from spies thanks to Snowden – MI6 chief

How does Allo plan on predicting your every word and witty emoji, you ask? “The more you use it, the more it improves over time,” which basically means they’ll collect and store as much of your data as possible and then use artificial intelligence to guess your replies.


However, the efficiency of time-saving typing may end up costing customers their already compromised privacy.

When Google first announced the introduction of Allo earlier this year they, too, had planned end-to-end-encryption in “Incognito Mode” and assured they would only store messages transiently, rather than indefinitely.

However,  it now appears that Google won’t be doing that after all. Wednesday’s announcement revealed Google plans to store all conversations that aren’t specifically started in “incognito mode” by default.


READ MORE: ‘Terrorism investigation’ Court lets NSA collect telephone records data

As Snowden pointed out, last year every single one of the NSA and FBI’s 1,457 surveillance requests was granted by the US foreign intelligence surveillance court… and Allo’s stored data (i.e. your data) will be fair game too.


In contrast, all of WhatsApp’s chats are encrypted and unreadable – although they did announce last month that they will now be sharing your contacts and who you talk to with Facebook.

READ MORE: ‘Betrayal of trust’? WhatsApp to start sharing user data with Facebook, corporations


Cover your webcams, says FBI chief

Taping over or otherwise covering up your computer’s web camera is a “sensible” thing that everyone should do, according to FBI Director James Comey. US spy agencies have had the ability to hack into webcams for years, according to whistleblowers.

Giving a keynote address at a conference marking the 10th anniversary of the National Security Division at the US Department of Justice, Comey sat down with Assistant Attorney General John Carlin and discussed things such as webcam security and Twitter. The event was hosted by the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), a Washington, DC think tank.

“Do you still have a piece of tape over your cameras at home?” Carlin asked.

“Heck yeah, oh, heck yeah,” Comey replied.

“It’s not crazy that the FBI director cares about personal security as well, and so I think people ought to take responsibility for their own safety and security,” Comey continued. “There are some sensible things you ought to be doing, and that’s one of them.”

The practice is apparently widespread at US government offices, according to the FBI chief.

“You go into any government office and we all have the little camera things that sit on top of the screen. They all have a little lid that closes down on them. You do that so that people who don’t have authority don’t look at you. I think that’s a good thing,” Comey explained.

While the FBI director admitted he was “mocked” after bringing up the tape trick in April this year – in part because he was involved in a heated dispute with Apple over access to the San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone at the time – it appears many have taken his advice to heart. A photo of Facebook tycoon Mark Zuckerberg earlier this year showed his office laptop with a piece of tape covering the webcam.


NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden revealed in 2013 that the government had tools to access not just computer webcams, but also the cameras in iPhones and BlackBerries.

Move over Koch bros: Facebook co-founder pledges $20mn to Dems

A Facebook co-founder has become the third biggest donor of the 2016 campaign, pledging $20 million to the presidential campaign of Hillary Clinton and other Democratic Party efforts. Donation data show Clinton is a clear favorite of US billionaires.

Dustin Moskovitz was the college roommate of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, and his current net worth is estimated at $10 billion. Until now, he had donated less than $5,000 to political campaigns – but this time, he says, it’s different.

His Thursday announcement continues the trend of the richest one percent of Americans overwhelmingly favoring Clinton, donating more than $200 million to her campaign by the end of July – compared to less than $20 million for Trump – according to the Center for Responsive Politics.

“Though we’ve voted for the Democratic nominee each of the times we’ve cast a ballot, we’ve considered ourselves independent thinkers who respect candidates and positions from both sides of the aisle,” Moskovitz and his wife, Cari Tuna, wrote on Medium.


This election has become “a referendum on who we want to be – as individuals, as a nation and as a society,” they argued, adding that they favored “increased tolerance, diversity and interdependence in the name of mutual prosperity.”

Accusing Republican nominee Donald Trump of stoking fear, tribalism, and divisiveness, the billionaire and his wife declared their support for the Democratic Party “and Hillary Clinton in particular,” who they say is “running on a vision of optimism, pragmatism, inclusiveness and mutual benefit.”

To that end, they have committed $20 million to be divided between the Hillary Victory Fund, the Senate and House Democrats, For Our Future PAC, MoveOn.org, Color of Change PAC, the League of Conservation Voters, and several other groups.

At least $5 million will go to the For Our Future PAC, according to TechCrunch. The political action committee was co-founded by another Democratic mega-donor, Tom Steyer, who has reportedly invested $31.5 million into this year’s campaign.


The donation would make Moskovitz the third-biggest single donor in this year’s campaign, CNN reported. He comes in after Steyer and Robert Mercer, a hedge fund manager who has given just over $20 million to various Republican groups and backs Trump.

Tuna, a Yale graduate and former Wall Street Journal reporter, has donated to the Democrats before. She spent $150,000 on Proposition 47, a California ballot initiative downgrading some drug possession charges, in 2014. That same year, she gave $26,000 to Sean Eldridge, a Democrat who ran for the US House of Representatives from New York, but lost.

In January of 2015, months before Trump entered the Republican race, the billionaire Koch Brothers announced they would raise almost $1 billion for various GOP causes in the 2016 election, but in April of this year – after Trump triumphed in the Republican primaries – they hinted they would support Clinton instead.